Home » Discourses, Delivered to the Second Presbyterian Society, in Newburyport, August 20, 1812: The Day Recommended by the President of the United States, for National Humiliation and Prayer by John Giles
Discourses, Delivered to the Second Presbyterian Society, in Newburyport, August 20, 1812: The Day Recommended the President of the United States, for National Humiliation and Prayer by John Giles

Discourses, Delivered to the Second Presbyterian Society, in Newburyport, August 20, 1812: The Day Recommended

the President of the United States, for National Humiliation and Prayer by John Giles

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331421122
Paperback
34 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Excerpt from Discourses, Delivered to the Second Presbyterian Society, in Newburyport, August 20, 1812: The Day Recommended by the President of the United States, for National Humiliation and PrayerThis Psalm is a short and concise history of theMoreExcerpt from Discourses, Delivered to the Second Presbyterian Society, in Newburyport, August 20, 1812: The Day Recommended by the President of the United States, for National Humiliation and PrayerThis Psalm is a short and concise history of the multiplied and unprovoked rebellions of the ungrateful Israelites- and the writer of it enumerates their sins and provocations against the goodness and blessings of God unto them. Jehovah had conducted them safely through scenes the most trying, and through dangers the most formidable and imminent, and brought them to the confines of the promised land- hut the spies brought an ill report of it. though they owned it was a land overflowed with milk and honey- hut (hat there were such difficulties to possess it, which they thought insuperable: and hence the people despised it - in as much as when they were bid to go and possess it, they refused- and did not chuse to be at any difficulty in subduing the inhabitants of it, or run any risk or hazard of their lives in taking it, though the Lord had promised to give it them and settle them in it. But they seemed rather inclined to make themselves a captain, and return to Egypt, which was interpreted a despising the pleasant land. - See Numb. xiv. 1.This history conveys much instruction to us, and is well adapted to the designs of the day. And, before we proceed in illustrating and improving it- the speaker must premise, that it is not his intent ion to irritate and inflame the feelings of any, in what he may deliver upon the present occasion. His motives are, the discharge of duty, and publicly to avow his warm, firm, and decided attachment, to the country which has adopted him as its citizen, and to the illustrious character who at present presides over it: and to this duty he is urged by lively gratitude, and the solemn oath which he has taken, of undeviating allegiance to it.First... Enquire what are those things which are absolutely necessary to constitute a land pleasant. And we observe,1. That a climate the most salubrious, and a soil the most fertile and luxuriant, which may spontaneously produce, nut only all the necessaries, but even the luxuries of life, may be rendered unhappy, and all these sweets blighted, and marred, through the intruding hand of some assuming and unfeeling tyrant. Such has been the state with the fertile lands of Portugal. Spain and Italy: and such is the still existing state of more prolific Turkey. The God of nature has, in those countries, scattered his gifts most profusely: but they are placed beyond the reach of the great mass of the people- a favoured few, engross the sweets to themselves, and like the forbidden fruit of Paradise, no hand dare pluck them without incurring the displeasure of their lords and masters.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.