Home » DANIEL Detective, Dragon Slayer, Lion Tamer by John Howard Reid
DANIEL Detective, Dragon Slayer, Lion Tamer John Howard Reid

DANIEL Detective, Dragon Slayer, Lion Tamer

John Howard Reid

Published February 17th 2012
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
15 pages
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 About the Book 

An ancient but thrilling account of brilliant detective work by a young Daniel (he of the lions’ den fame), Daniel Detective or Susanna is one of the most exciting stories in the Bible. The scene in which Daniel cross-examines Susanna’s accusers isMoreAn ancient but thrilling account of brilliant detective work by a young Daniel (he of the lions’ den fame), Daniel Detective or Susanna is one of the most exciting stories in the Bible. The scene in which Daniel cross-examines Susanna’s accusers is thriller writing at its best. The Greek version of Susanna, which lacks some important details, particularly in the cross-examination – details which I have now supplied from hints in the Bible text – is regarded as Holy Scripture by both Orthodox and Catholic churches.However, neither church would claim that the story was necessarily true, despite its wealth of detail. But whether fact or fiction, this ancient story in which the young Daniel plays detective, is a fascinating piece which fully deserves a wider readership than an occasional perusal by Bible scholars who probably hate detective stories anyway!Both Daniel, Dragon Slayer and Daniel, Lion Tamer were obviously penned by different ancient authors. Both are also printed in the Greek Septuagint Bible and are therefore regarded as Scripture by Catholic and Orthodox churches.Strangely, neither church claims that Dragon Slayer and the subsequent confrontation with the priests of Bel are necessarily true, despite an enormous amount of evidence that this scenario actually occurred. Admittedly, it’s highly unlikely that the fraud was discovered by Daniel. But whoever the unsung hero, it’s certainly a neat piece of detection.Although Daniel, Lion Tamer is rejected by Protestants, it’s plainly and simply another version of Daniel in the Lion’s Den which Protestants do accept as Scripture. I’ll admit this policy of rejecting duplications makes a great deal of sense, but why wasn’t this process of elimination applied to many of the numerous far more important text duplications in the Bible? In any case, this version is, if anything, more forceful than the other. It is not only much more detailed and convincing, but the king’s orders and his change-of-heart seem far more believable. (4,275 words).